Travels of Ali Bey [pseud.] in Morocco, Tripoli, Cyprus, Egypt, Arabia, Syria, and Turkey: Between the Years 1803 and 1807, Volume 1

Couverture
John Conrad, at the Shakespeare buildings, James Maxwell, Printer, 1816
 

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Page 215 - Seeing us in this distressed situation, he ordered some skins of water to be thrown over us. After I had received several of them over my face and hands, I recovered my senses, opened my eyes, and looked around me, without being able to discern any body. At last, however, I distinguished seven or right sheriffs and fakeers, who gave me their assistance, and shewed 'me much kindness.
Page 215 - Fear nothing; far from being robbers, we are your friends;' and every one mentioned his name. I began, by degrees, to recollect their faces, but was not able to remember their names. They poured again over me a still greater quantity of water, gave me some to drink, filled some of my leather bags, and left me in haste, as every minute spent in this place was precious to them, and could not be repaired. " This attack of thirst is perceived all of a sudden by an extreme aridity of the skin ; the eyes...
Page 120 - Sultan was composed of a troop of fifteen to twenty men on horseback ; about an hundred steps behind them came the Sultan, who was mounted on a mule, with an officer bearing his umbrella, who rode by his side also on a mule. The umbrella is a distinguishing sign of the Sovereign of Morocco. Nobody but himself, his sons, and brothers, dare to make use of it ; however I had this high honour conferred on me.
Page 162 - ... hair, and which he keeps half shut ; the construction of his feet, broad and cushion-like, prevents his treading deep into the sand : his long legs enable him to pass the same space with only half the number of steps of any other animal, and therefore with less fatigue. These advantages give him a solid and easy gait, on a ground where all other animals walk with slow, short, and uncertain steps, and in a tottering manner.
Page 214 - ... forsaken them as well as the care of my effects and of my instruments. I looked upon this loss with the greatest indifference as if they had not belonged to me, and pushed on. But my horse began now to tremble under me, and yet he was the strongest of the whole caravan. We proceeded in silent despair. When I endeavoured to encourage any of them to increase his pace, he answered me by looking steadily...
Page 213 - I began to feel that my own strength was beginning to forsake me; and becoming very weak, I determined to mount on horseback, leaving the poor fellow behind. From this moment others...
Page 160 - The country presented no change from that which we passed yesterday. The sandy plain into which we had come may with truth be called a little Sahara ; the wind is there of a surprising rapidity, and the sand so extremely fine, that it forms on the ground some waves, which look like those of the sea. These waves rise up so fast, that in a very few hours a hill of about 20 to 30 feet high is transported from one place to another. I never thought it possible, and did not believe it till I was convinced...
Page 96 - These consist in washing the hands three times successively, as well as the face, the arms, the head, the neck, and the feet ; and also the inside of the mouth, of the ears, and of the nostrils. It is for the purpose of these ablutions that fountains are so abundantly provided. In places where no water is to be had the ablution may be made with earth or sand. This practice is followed by persons...
Page 80 - This respect arises from a strange belief, handed down from time immemorial, that the Storks are human beings in that form, men from some distant islands, who, at certain seasons of the year, assume the shape of these birds, that they may visit Barbary, and return at a fixed time to their own country, where they resume the human form.
Page 170 - He had around ruddy coloured face, lively eyes, and a small beard white as snow ; he was of a low stature, full and well proportioned. His dress was always the same ; it consisted of a kind of shirt or small white woollen caftan, a little turban, and a sort of Hha.ik or light woollen cloth, which. covered his head and hung down behind, and on the sides like a small cloak. He spoke a little through the nose, but with much sweetness. The eldest son of this saint follows the footsteps of his father,...

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